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Council e-Newsletter 10
By: Susan Black 12/1/2011

Girl Scouts of South Carolina - Mountains to Midlands

THE SCOOP

Eight Delegates Represented Our Council at the National Convention

Twenty-six adults and girls represented our council this month at the Girl Scouts of the USA National Convention in Houston, Texas, as delegates, staff, Girl Scout Leadership Institute (GSLI) members, and official visitors. This triennium event supported 12,000 participants from across the country and abroad.

Serving our council as National Delegates elected by their peers were (l-r): Chantella Crosby, Wellford; Kaitlyn Ward, Irmo; Kim Neel, Columbia; Deborah Howell, Greer; Karen Mitchell, Chair, Board of Directors, Spartanburg; Dr. Michelle Martin, Columbia; Misty Carpenter, Lancaster; and Bett Williams, Columbia. Not pictured: Kim Hutzell, CEO, who served as an official Alternate Delegate.

Representative Laurie Funderburk gave keynote remarks


Lee Morriss (L), VP/COO, GSSC-MM; Rep. Funderburk (R)

When our council teamed with Columbia’s IT-oLogy to encourage middle school girls to surf the cyber world safely and to educate parents on the importance of cyber safety, Representative Laurie Funderburk gave the keynote remarks at the workshop in mid-September.



WHAT'S NEW

Updated Badges Offered

Girl Scout councils across the country have recently rolled out an all-new collection of badges aimed at giving girls the leadership skills they need to succeed in today’s world.  Girls can still earn popular, traditional proficiency badges such as Naturalist, Athlete, and Cook − topics as relevant today as they were in 1912 − but now they also have badges reflecting current interests such as Product Designer, Digital Movie Maker, Customer Loyalty, and even the Science of Happiness.  And new “Make Your Own” badges at every level give girls the opportunity to explore any interest they choose.
 
“In addition to combining the updated badge program with the Leadership Journey, we have launched the Girl’s Guide to Girl Scouting which is the next exciting chapter of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience as we enter our 100th year,” states Kim Hutzell, President and CEO, Girl Scouts of South Carolina – Mountains to Midlands

Eight Delegates Represented Our Council at the National Convention

Twenty-six adults and girls represented our council this month at the Girl Scouts of the USA National Convention in Houston, Texas, as delegates, staff, Girl Scout Leadership Institute (GSLI) members, and official visitors. This triennium event supported 12,000 participants from across the country and abroad.

Serving our council as National Delegates elected by their peers were (l-r): Chantella Crosby, Wellford; Kaitlyn Ward, Irmo; Kim Neel, Columbia; Deborah Howell, Greer; Karen Mitchell, Chair, Board of Directors, Spartanburg; Dr. Michelle Martin, Columbia; Misty Carpenter, Lancaster; and Bett Williams, Columbia. Not pictured: Kim Hutzell, CEO, who served as an official Alternate Delegate.

Representative Laurie Funderburk gave keynote remarks


Lee Morriss (L), VP/COO, GSSC-MM; Rep. Funderburk (R)

When our council teamed with Columbia’s IT-oLogy to encourage middle school girls to surf the cyber world safely and to educate parents on the importance of cyber safety, Representative Laurie Funderburk gave the keynote remarks at the workshop in mid-September.

WHAT'S NEW

Updated Badges Offered

Girl Scout councils across the country have recently rolled out an all-new collection of badges aimed at giving girls the leadership skills they need to succeed in today’s world.  Girls can still earn popular, traditional proficiency badges such as Naturalist, Athlete, and Cook − topics as relevant today as they were in 1912 − but now they also have badges reflecting current interests such as Product Designer, Digital Movie Maker, Customer Loyalty, and even the Science of Happiness.  And new “Make Your Own” badges at every level give girls the opportunity to explore any interest they choose.
 
“In addition to combining the updated badge program with the Leadership Journey, we have launched the Girl’s Guide to Girl Scouting which is the next exciting chapter of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience as we enter our 100th year,” states Kim Hutzell, President and CEO, Girl Scouts of South Carolina – Mountains to Midlands

IN GIRLS WE TRUST

10 girls attended the Girl Scout Leadership Institute

10 local Girl Scouts, ages 13 or older, were specially selected from among 41 council applications to attend the Girl Scout Leadership Institute (GSLI) in Houston where the 2011 National Girl Scout Convention was held.  The Institute brought together 1,200 girls nationwide who demonstrated leadership in their councils to connect and take action on matters that touch the future for girls and our movement.

Attending the GSLI this year were:  Zoe – Columbia, Rachel – Columbia, Haley – Aiken, Morgan – Simpsonville, Makayla – Spartanburg, Lindsey – Anderson, Grace – Columbia, Mary Catherine – Spartanburg, Kelsey  – Simpsonville and Celeste – Seneca.
 
Focus areas this year included:  Global Connections, Innovation in Marketing, Innovation in Business, Innovation in Technology and Science, and Leadership.
 

Support Girls

A donation to the Membership Fund supports girls who desire the Girl Scout experience but who are unable to pay the annual $12 national membership fee due to financial difficulty. Girls may apply for membership assistance through their local Service Center at the time of their annual membership registration. Support Girls Today!

Did You Know...?

Reality TV has become such widespread entertainment for young people and adults that the Girl Scout Research Institute did a survey of more than 1,100 girls around the country to see what impact it may have on their ability to lead. Following are some of the key findings:

The most popular types of reality TV are competition (American Idol, Project Runway etc.) and real life (Jersey Shore, the Hills, etc.). Many girls think these programs reflect reality with 75% saying that competition shows are “mainly real and unscripted” and 50% saying that real-life shows are “mainly real and unscripted.”  All girls feel that reality shows promote bad behavior.  For example:

  • 86% think these shows often pit girls against each other to make the shows more exciting.
  • 73% think the shows make people think that fighting is a normal part of a romantic relationship.
  • 70% feel it makes people think it’s o.k. to treat others badly.

 

 

 


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